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New Classic EZ400

How do you want it ...?

 

EZ400 can be processed in every common negative developer. We do though vouch for the development methods and the provided developing time chart. However, if you find a different formula that you prefer - let us know how it goes!
 

Agitation

Agitate or turn over continuously during the first 30 seconds, then for 10 seconds every following minute. These instructions should yield medium-contrast negatives.
 

Development

See dev chart below for options. We encourage you to experiment! 


Stop bath

Once development has elapsed, you can rinse this film with a branded stop bath or plain distilled water.
 

Fixing

You can fix the developed film for 10 minutes in any common type of acidic fixing bath, or for at least 3 minutes in a rapid fixer. Temperature range should be 18-25C / 65-77F.

Final Wash

You should rinse your negatives thoroughly after fixing. To save water, you can exchange fresh water 8-10 times, as opposed to simply using running water for a long period of time. A rinse in wetting agent before drying will help reduce drying marks and help preserve your negatives.

Developing Times

Developer
Dilution
20C / 68F
30C/86F
Kodak D76
Stock
7-8
2.5
Kodak HC-110
1+31
6:30
n/a
Kodak Xtol
Stock
7
2
Ilford Ilfosol 3
1+9
6
n/a
Ilford Microphen
Stock
8-9
3.5
Ilford ID 11
Stock
7-8
2.5
Fomadon R09
1+25
6
n/a
Fomadon R09
1+50
11-12
n/a
Adox Rodinal
1+25
5:30
n/a
Adox Rodinal
1+50
11
n/a

Making things a bit more interesting ...

Try these different exposure and development techniques to alter the look of your images:

  • rate your film at ISO 200 (develop as 400) in order to give it more light -- blooming highlights, increased shadow detail, less overall contrast

  • pull develop your film -- less contrast, more shadow detail, "control" the highlights

    • pull means to overexpose your film and compensate during development​ (develop for less time)

  • push develop your film -- more contrast, more grain, deeper blacks and shadows

    • push means to underexposed your film in camera, and compensate during development​ (develop for more time)